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Q: What does it mean when my brakes squeal when I apply them?

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Some minimal brake noise is unavoidable, so there might not be any problem at all if your brakes are making squealing sounds. Demanding driving conditions such as heavy stop-and-go traffic, humidity, dust or sand, and other situations that require abusive braking habits might cause your brakes to squeal, even if they are perfectly healthy. However, continuous brake squealing could also be an indicator of a faulty component or worn brake pads. If you are concerned, it’s better to have your vehicle checked by a service technician.
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Q: My car squeals when I’m not applying the brakes. What does this mean?

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This is usually an indication that your brake pads have worn down enough to allow the sensor or wear indicator to touch the disc brake rotor. The sensor then emits that high-pitched noise in order to let you know the brake pads need to be changed. They should be serviced as soon as possible to prevent more costly damage.
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Q: My brakes make a grinding or groaning sound at low speeds. What’s the problem?

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This brake sound is actually often quite normal, especially in cars with front-wheel drive or semi-metallic brake pads. However, if you begin to hear this sound at every stop, your vehicle might require a complete brake system inspection.
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Q: It is becoming harder for my vehicle to stop while I’m applying the brakes, and the pedal moves down further than usual. What’s wrong?

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This question is dangerous because the problem could be literally anything from air trapped in the brake system to total brake failure. The best option in this situation is to have your vehicle serviced by a professional as soon as possible. This could prevent damaging your car, as well as avoid putting yourself in a possible life-threatening situation.
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Q: What does the color of brake fluid indicate?

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Brake fluid often will become cloudy or less clear over time because it is formulated to absorb moisture. If you change your brake fluid and the new fluid is clearer than the old, this is likely normal. It is recommended, however, that you drain and replace your brake fluid at least once every two years.
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